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05/05/2018

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Brent

Reading through the comments on the humble/honest Buzzfeed page, it seems that the kids aren't making much of a distinction in the meaning of two words either. It seems to be a case of sincerity is good, politeness is good, therefore sincerity must be politeness. Or at the very least they're running into enough people using IMHO in a pushy way that they assume it can't be humble. I've also had someone try to tell me it stood for "holy"... I'm not sure if they were joking, but that's certainly even further away from humble.

And as for Giuliani's comments being as good as a parody... as I've been saying for a couple years, "Welcome to the Poe Singularity". The distance to "extreme" is now zero... reality and parody can easily be mistaken for each other.

Mary McNeil

This morning on NPR they suggested "homeopathic" - as in making you feel good but not really accomplishing anything.

My favorite grammar evolution is "busted." The local news people all say "The police busted in the door." "He busted his arm." When I was a kid even us kids knew the word "broken."

Kip W

Was that Yogi Bear or Yogi Berra? The latter was more of a phrasemaker, while the former said a few things a lot of times in a memorable voice.

Mike Peterson

The Bear. Definitely the bear. I remember him well.

Brad Walker

You mean the fur-covered Art Carney? Actually I'd been thinking of Yogi recently, because I'd seen a couple of reviews (takedowns) of the Dan Aykroyd movie, but also because DC comics has been publishing "realistic" version of the HB classic characters.

In fact...

(SPOILER ALERT)

Huckleberry Hound and Quick Draw McGraw become gay lovers, and then one of them commits suicide.

Really.

AFAIK this storyline has provoked no controversy, which is kinda odd when you think of what happened with the Rawhide Kid.

gezorkin


Kind of a mute point, doncha think?

Kip W

Thanks for re-specifying. Now I know what voice to use in my head.

You got me thinking about Yogi again. I tweeted today that Yogi Bear is Jellystone's Perfect Master, because he's more enlightened than the average yogi.

Mike Peterson

This should help:
https://youtu.be/16ZAeyezzxg

Kip W

Now, that's a surreal experience. It's like a cross between Ronnie Lavelle (in its personation of Yogi) and Unkie Dunkie (in the weird syl-la-ble by syl-la-ble delivery).

Ronnie Lavelle- "Cartoons"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mT5TwFeTGxI
(Lavelle also reminds me of the off-brand cartoon LPs where the voices were done by some unfortunate staffer or other. The Yogi one in the set was actually pretty fair, and for some reason I keep thinking it's Jack Mercer doing the almost-dead-on voice.)

Unkie Dunkie, The Baloney Slicer- "Mortimer"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXj3xiSsIgc
(Dunkie, on the other hand, was a butcher who thought he'd record a comedy record, so he stood in a studio reading a word at a time, and someone added excessive—and repetitive—audience sounds, rimshots, SFX, and music. It's a hypnotically horrific listening experience.)

Kip W

Now, that's a surreal experience. It's like a cross between Ronnie Lavelle (in its personation of Yogi) and Unkie Dunkie (in the weird syl-la-ble by syl-la-ble delivery).

Ronnie Lavelle- "Cartoons"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mT5TwFeTGxI
(Lavelle also reminds me of the off-brand cartoon LPs where the voices were done by some unfortunate staffer or other. The Yogi one in the set was actually pretty fair, and for some reason I keep thinking it's Jack Mercer doing the almost-dead-on voice.)

Kip W

Unkie Dunkie, The Baloney Slicer- "Mortimer"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXj3xiSsIgc
(Dunkie, on the other hand, was a butcher who thought he'd record a comedy record, so he stood in a studio reading a word at a time, and someone added excessive—and repetitive—audience sounds, rimshots, SFX, and music. It's a hypnotically horrific listening experience.)

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